Columbus, OH, Newport Music Hall, October 3, 2006

 

Written and photos by: Jason Perlman

 

Scottish singer/songwriter KT Tunstall brought her unusual yet familiar sound of acoustic folk mixed with pop rock to the Newport Music Hall and performed about 75 minutes to the few hundred fans that worked their way as close to the stage as possible.

As Tunstall took the stage to a respectful round of applause, she quickly strummed her acoustic strings and broke into song. When Miniature Disaster was started, it seemed to strike a chord with both Tunstall and the audience as the kicker into the rest of the show. From then on, there was personal repartee and small-club banter than can only happen in a venue such as The Newport.

 

For Tunstall, it has been a road less traveled across the pond to the United States as well as launching her career. Deemed as too old in her current living quarters of England, labels were quick to turn down Tunstall feeling her 27-year-old body would not resonate with the record-buyers. But little-known Relentless Records took the chance and released Tunstall's first UK record. After selling over a million copies across Europe, the US was still unfamiliar with this rising star until Katharine MacPhee sang Black Horse and a Cherry Tree on American Idol. From then on, Tunstall found out that television, a little-known media to herself was key to making a success of herself in the States. So, trips to The Today Show and local shows in the States provided Tunstall with the foot in the door needed to try and make it in the television hungry US.

 

Even with the foot in the door, Tunstall still has to prove herself night after night playing small venues and winning fans over a few at a time. And her show at the Newport was one step in proving she deserves the fans she has established.

 

With a voice that is constantly compared to other UK artists such as Dido and Natasha Bedingfield, it has been hard for Tunstall to make her own way in America. But do not be fooled by some critics, as both her record and live performance show flashes of brilliant vocal changes and hopefully the future holds more variance and chance-taking from this artist. Tunstall, when performing live, seems to take more chances and dives within herself more than her record Eye To The Telescope show. Tunstall and her band took the stage with a sense of grateful ownership and performed with the same sense of gratitude that people actually paid music to see her perform her music.

 

Tunstall's live show should not be based off her record as each show is made special and Tunstall ensures that the audience is as integrated into the show as herself.

KT Tunstall
KT Tunstall
KT Tunstall