Columbus, OH, Lifestyles Community Pavilion, January 26, 2006


Written and photos by: Jason Perlman

 

For decades now, rock and roll has been seen as the music of choice for beer, babes and debauchery. But slowly and surely, country music is filling the void that began in the early 90s when the grunge scene took over. After the heyday of hair metal, hard rock music became an image of commonality and non-conformity, leaving a large gap for people who used going to concerts as an excuse to indulge in some necessary sins.

 

Along came the new breed of country music and now, artists such as Big and Rich and Toby Keith are becoming known as the rebel-rousing, beer drinking, topless girl concert to be, and although no bare breasts were shown at this show, Trace Adkins is also adding his name to the good-time, country rock concert to be.

Although the Lifestyles Community (LC) Pavilion is new to hosting a country concert, and country fans may be new to the LC Pavilion, the two meshed nicely and the sold-out crowd was definitely pleased to have a venue to house those mid-level country acts. Adkins came out with his signature long locks, black hat and duster, and as soon as his deep baritone voice broke into Songs About Me, the pace for the rest of the 90-minute show was set.

 

Already with six records under his belt, Adkins is touring to promote his seventh, entitled Songs About Me. With so much material to choose from, the 90 minutes went by fairly quickly, but Adkins was able to construct a song list with at least something from each record, but didn't solely rely on radio hits. For Adkins, life in the country world has been a great mix of 60s style sound with new millennium flair. His soulful voice gives out that rag-tag, melancholy feel of a Johnny Cash tune, while his upbeat tempo and lyrics allow a good amount of crossover fans. And the audience definitely had that crossover look.

 

The ages were from 10-60, and the gender, genre of clothing stores and style of hats were just as varied.

 

Although I am sure most fans were eager to hear the encore song, Honky Tonk Ba-Donka- Donk, it was when Adkins played his older, softer melodies such as Arlington and Lonely that his talent was really allowed to shine. Although maybe the general population thinks country music is singing with a Southern accent, Adkins proves there is more to it than that. His ability to use his voice as yet another instrument in his band allows for a raw emotion to be felt that for many country artists, just isn't quite there.

Adkins will continue his tour throughout 2006, and although no other Ohio dates are announced, there is some open time in the summer for another possible Ohio visit. For those who were at the LC Pavilion, it is common knowledge that if another trip through Ohio were to occur, the price of admission is well worth it. For those that missed the show, fingers can be crossed in hopes of another visit. In the meantime, listen to songs beyond his radio hits and then the real Trace Adkins can be heard. After all, that was what his live show proved.

Trace Adkins
Trace Adkins
Trace Adkins
Trace Adkins