Columbus, OH, Newport Music Hall, June 10, 2008

 

Written and photos by: Jason Perlman

 

With Lifestyle Community Pavilion at about  a third full and a sold-out crowd anticipated, Charlie Brand and the rest of the Miniature Tigers took the stage with little posing and an even lesser fanfare. But once the Bill-Cosby sweater wearing Brand opened up his pips and strummed on his guitar, the sensitivity and subtle nuance that is Miniature Tigers came forth for the 30-minute set.

 

Although it seemed most in the audience were unfamiliar with this Sebastian and Belle-like band, it didn’t take long for the Ben Folds waiting audience to get into the groove provided by spastic yet controlled drummer Rick Alvin Shaier and it really came together during the song Dino Damage.

 

Once the audience got past the Teddy bear sweater that looked like every grandma gift to her not-so-favorite redheaded grandson and focused on the music, it didn’t take long for the somewhat surprising narrow-minded audience to open up to this ultra-sensitive pop rock.  Brand’s voice was surprisingly full of as much range live as recorded and the state persona was so natural it was almost nerve-racking. It didn’t take long for the sweater to create a static shock from the mic to Brand’s lip, and it seemed from that comical moment, the tension eased between an unsure crowd and a confident singer.

 

Highlights were the new song Japanese Woman Living in My Closet and the single Tell It To The Volcano, but to use the ultra in cliché, the Miniature Tigers are definitely a buzz worthy band and is “on the rise.”  The catchiness of each song is almost enough to drive one insane, in a good way, and it seems as if each song that was played sounded more like jingles for a Volkswagen commercial versus songs off an EP. But even with the easy listening and memorable sound, underneath it all was an independent voice that spoke unconventionally and had an individualism that is not heard enough from newer acts.

 

Miniature Tigers is a band that most likely will never be able to sell out arenas on its own, but has a sound so connecting with those who listen that the band should be able to have a long career with dedicated fans and spurts of stardom.  Very much like the act it was opening up for.

Rick Alvin Shaier
Charlie Brand
Charlie Brand
Charlie Brand
Rick Alvin Shaier
Eli Brandom